entertainment

Life of A-bomb-hit Hiroshima girl and family being made into film

17 Comments

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Another one? There has to be at least a dozen similarly themed movies already.

18 ( +25 / -7 )

I can imagine it. More victim playing

20 ( +28 / -8 )

JT readers keeping it classy

-15 ( +8 / -23 )

yet still Japan refuses the denuclearization treat.

God help them, 'cause the UN is not gonna.

13 ( +16 / -3 )

Cashing in on tragedy.

14 ( +18 / -4 )

What a wonderful idea! Just what we need.....said no one.

12 ( +15 / -3 )

My film clip: August 6, 1945, Hiroshima: A boy leaves his house to go to school. While walking there, he sees an airplane. Just one, so he's not scared. A few minutes later, there is a bright flash of light, a huge blast sound, and a shock wave slams him to the ground. But the pain does not last long because a few seconds later he is vaporized.

10 ( +13 / -3 )

"It's time to let it go, it happened so long ago, and no generation alive today is responsible"

11 ( +13 / -2 )

Isn't it time they just let this go, already? I mean, we hear that argument time and again from the J-government, people, and even posters on here when it comes to facing Japan's atrocities, but how is it different when they were the victims -- of taking the extreme arguments of some and flipping them, WERE they victims? Were the bombings, as some Americans claim, and Japan claims its acts were, simply self-defense?

In any case, hypocrisy aside, will, at the end of this documentary, the makers have video of Abe and Suga saying Japan will not join a ban on nuclear weapons? If not, don't bother making it.

15 ( +18 / -3 )

This is one way for Japan to gingerly heckle their own atrocities out of the worldwide public domain and a carthasis for their own guilt.

13 ( +16 / -3 )

Some historical incidents have no statute of limitations. Doesn't make a difference if a mere 75yrs or 500yrs have passed. They should not be forgotten. However, this will most likely end up once again portraying the bombing as a crime against humanity and the Japanese as victims. If they include the bombing of Pearl Harbour, mention the atrocities by the Japanese, and that the Allies asked them to surrender twice and Japan refusing, then it could actually be educational especially for today's Japanese youth who have no real idea what happened due to the government's and ministry of education's whitewashing of WWII. If you want people to remember, have them remember all of it.

6 ( +9 / -3 )

Victim playing trash. In my opinion using children is cheap.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

I met a Korean woman, a long time ago, whose father had been a laborer in Hiroshima when the Atomic Bomb went off. His family feared he was dead, but several months later, without any notice, he walked in the door of their home in Korea. She didn't say much more than that, other than that they were very happy to see him again.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

@1glenn

People who have undergone severe trauma usually don't easily talk of their experiences. At least not for some time and some never. I know because you are reading from one such individual now.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

It is not victim playing but a warning. Unless something changes history will repeat itself. Except this time Americans are going to be on the receiving end.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

I am ok with it, IF IF IF, the flick includes how children in the Far East & South East Asia suffered & were killed to balance this out some.......yeah right, will NEVER happen here!!!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

GWJan. 26 01:13 pm JST

I am ok with it, IF IF IF, the flick includes how children in the Far East & South East Asia suffered & were killed to balance this out some.......yeah right, will NEVER happen here!!!

Exactly!  Does one ever think that the Japanese civilian population was told of the atrocities or learned them in school?   For example, Japanese soldiers in the Philippines removing the eyeballs out of little children’s faces and writing their names in kanji on the walls using the eyeballs as ink.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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