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Which music from the past 70 years do you think people will still be listening to 100 years from now?

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Jazz e.g. albums like Miles Davis 'Kind of Blue' and 'In a Silent Way'. Songs by Ray Charles, Fats Domino, the Beatles and Rolling Stones.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

To the above I'll add Run-DMC.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Thought you would have said, “The Who’

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Interesting question. I'd say music historians in 2021 will be interested in the birth of rock 'n' roll. I think music of the groups from the 1960s have stood the test of time -- the Beatles, Rolling Stones, to name just two. I'd also imagine jazz, R&B will still be popular. Plus maybe Frank Sinatra, and will Bing be still crooning "White Christmas" in 2021?

I wonder what music from 1921 we would be listening to today if there had been recording technology then.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

50's and 60's old rock.

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I think the stuff that is from the heart and not based on trends or heavily dependent on current technology will always find appreciation. Trends become parodies of themselves, and technology becomes dated and stale very quickly. For example, singers who use their natural voice rather than the manipulated stuff that is so common now will be listened to. The autotuned voices will be cliched images of the last century. Dylan, Chris Whitley, Amy Winehouse, Iggy Pop, Radiohead....those who are unique and authentic to themselves will still be heard.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Many hit songs from dance pop to ballads to heavy metal from the last 70 years are directly ripped off from or based on classical pieces from centuries ago. Bach seems to be a particular favourite.

Great melodies and songwriting are timeless. The likes of the The Beatles, Bob Dylan and Stevie Wonder will still be listened to in 100 years and ripped off.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Bob Marley, Chuck Berry, Elvis, Nina Simone, Prince, Kate Bush, Bjork, Miles Davis, Public Enemy, U2, Fela Kuti, The Dubliners, Stevie Wonder, Madonna, Joni Mitchell, Leonard Cohen, Missy Elliot, Amy Winehouse, Bob Dylan, The Clash, The Beatles, Kraftwerk, Van Morrison, Rolling Stones, Sepultura, Black Sabbath, Miriam Makeba, Talking Heads, er... Half Man Half Biscuit

(warning - this incomplete list may contain some bias, natch)

I wonder what music from 1921 we would be listening to today if there had been recording technology then.

We're on the cusp of some fantastic blues musicians and singers like Mississippi John Hurt, Robert Johnson, Bessie Smith et al... so late 20s gets a look in.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Many hit songs from dance pop to ballads to heavy metal from the last 70 years are directly ripped off from or based on classical pieces from centuries ago. Bach seems to be a particular favourite.

Bach isn’t from the ‘classical’ period for any pedantic types out there.

Slap round the head from the wife.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Bach isn’t from the ‘classical’ period for any pedantic types out there.

Slap round the head from the wife.

Baroque 'n' roll?

4 ( +5 / -1 )

My bet would be on Jazz and Rock.

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Understood & agreed with your ideas @smartacus ”...music historians in 2021 will be interested in...” But,... doesn’t ‘2021 + 100 = 2121’ ? ; )

The 1920’s was the era of ‘ragtime, jazz and the beginning of ‘prohibition’. We probably don’t hear much of it today, aside from in movies.

@ToastedHeretic looks like the aficionado here. They could probably tell us best how many of their recommendations were influenced by That 1920’s era.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I agree with almost all of the comments above, and would also like to add some timeless classics from the world of electronic music - in addition to Kraftwerk, I'd think people will still have interest towards e.g. Sven Väth, Jeff Mills, Juan Atkins & other detroit techno legends, deep house, and some carefully crafted 90's trance pieces.

Also blues, and ethno - quite naturally.

Any commercial pop pieces made with the money on the mind however, are like fast fashion of music:

listened to a few times this year, forgotten the next, ridiculed after that - deservedly so.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

In 100 years? Not even one of what you named, but quite surely something like African-Arab-Latin-Techno-Rap , in this direction music can develop only, if it is not even completely forbidden by fanatics.

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I'd think people will still have interest towards e.g. Sven Väth, Jeff Mills, Juan Atkins & other detroit techno legends, deep house, and some carefully crafted 90's trance pieces.

Techno and trance music dates more quickly. A bit faddish and samey to survive for me. More products of a time and to be played in a particular place rather than timeless music. I respect Kraftwerk as pioneers but their sound has become a bit plastic even today given the technology they were using. I don’t think their melodies or songwriting are something that will survive a 100 years.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Much of the music from the 60's&70's. The Beatles.

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The likes of the The Beatles, Bob Dylan and Stevie Wonder will still be listened to in 100 years and ripped off.

Bob Dylan, I'm not so sure, but the Beatles, Michael Jackson, Jimi Hendrix, Elvis, Duke Ellington will definitely be timeless classics that people around the world will always listen to even 200 years from now. Music is subjective, but if you go by the popular songs that people sing in Karaoke bars, learn to play on their instruments or classic pieces that people hear in quiet settings, or even music that was replicated and sampled and used in modern music these legends will have withstood the test of time.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

I respect Kraftwerk as pioneers but their sound has become a bit plastic even today given the technology they were using. I don’t think their melodies or songwriting are something that will survive a 100 years.

A huge influence on hip-hop, synth pop, electronica, house, techno, ambient, Depeche Mode, New Order, Bowie and, er, Coldplay.

I respectfully disagree with your prediction, and imagine the Kraftwerk symphonies lasting for all eternity.

Anyway, it's all subjective. In reality, Coldplay's pop ditties will probably exist until the sun finally extinguishes itself, and the last radio signals fall on deaf ears.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Bob Dylan, I'm not so sure, but the Beatles, Michael Jackson, Jimi Hendrix, Elvis, Duke Ellington will definitely be timeless classics.

You needn't worry about Dylan, his place in music history is secure. The public gets it, musicians get it.

Ellington:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zT_7zWSjxys

Hendrix:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ktjpxrIFOx8

Elvis:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0dRNZZuuR8I

Beatles:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mnuUpjydTBY

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Bob Dylan, I'm not so sure

I think Dylan will be regarded highly as a writer of beautiful melodies as well as a chronicler of the times. Like a Rolling Stone often tops critic’s choices as the greatest song of all time over 50 years after it was recorded. The Nobel Prize will help see him retain lasting fame.

I’m not sure about Hendrix. He was a very good guitarist, but as a songwriter not on the same planet as Lennon/McCartney, Dylan or Stevie Wonder. I wouldn’t put him on the same level of his contemporary songwriters like Ray Davies, Pete Townsend, Lou Reed, Jagger/Richards and others in terms of leaving memorable music behind.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

CityPop and Ballad Rock.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

Milli Vanilli

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

Everything up to the 1980’s, when quality heart-n-soul music took a back seat to video music with bouncing boobs, big hair, flannel shirts, pants on the ground, etc.

invalid CSRF

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

Jimizo

Techno and trance music dates more quickly. A bit faddish and samey to survive for me. More products of a time and to be played in a particular place rather than timeless music. I respect Kraftwerk as pioneers but their sound has become a bit plastic even today given the technology they were using. I don’t think their melodies or songwriting are something that will survive a 100 years.

And yet, funnily enough, techno & trance classics done 30+ years ago still make the crowds go wild at any ug raves and clubs, and also at Berghain. Especially a lot of trance (and I'm not talking about the cheesy euro trance here) borrows from classical music as well. People also naturally respond to rhythm, what techno is all about.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Probably non of the above, if the same question were asked in 1921 you would have got a similar range of opinions for the popular music of the time, virtually nothing of which is known to the majority of people today (so much so that smartacus wasn’t aware there was recording media then and before).

Interesting the choices, I suspect driven by individual tastes and when they were youths!

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

1920's. Robert Johnson, still listening. Louis Armstrong. Josephine Baker. The great Billie Holiday.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

And yet, funnily enough, techno & trance classics done 30+ years ago still make the crowds go wild at any ug raves and clubs

Fair enough but it is very time and place music ( often best listened to when under the influence at a particular place ). It is a bit limited.

I actually don’t mind it, but I don’t see it as comparable to what Lennon/McCartney, Dylan or Stevie Wonder created. Unbelievable songwriting skill and that resonates with a very wide audience and age group in any place and in pretty much any state of mind.

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Not sure, but I would hope it doesn’t include drum machines, and has a vocal range greater than 4 notes.

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Interesting the choices, I suspect driven by individual tastes and when they were youths!

Agreed.

Every generation berates what comes after and idolises what they listened to in their formative years.

I grew up listening to the likes of John Peel and Dave Fanning, who respected the past but also championed the new. I feel that's the way to approach music.

That's why I still thrill to new sounds broadcast on the likes of NTS and 6 Music, amongst others.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Jimizo

Fair enough but it is very time and place music ( often best listened to when under the influence at a particular place ). It is a bit limited.

I actually don’t mind it, but I don’t see it as comparable to what Lennon/McCartney, Dylan or Stevie Wonder created. Unbelievable songwriting skill and that resonates with a very wide audience and age group in any place and in pretty much any state of mind.

You're of course entitled to your opinion, but, with respect, I think your comment reveals you actually may not know that much of the genre(s)? First and foremost, I really detest this idea people have, that you'd need to be "under influence" whilst listening to ug/deep electronic music, like deep techno (but I guess media and movies have painted this picture). The music itself really is enough - you don't need any other substances. Talking with 20+ years of experience in the scene, from various countries. Electronic music can also be very calming or emotional. Check e.g. Murcof, who is taking a lot of influence from classical music, like baroque.

Sorry, but I also don't really understand why would it be "time and place music" or "limited". Who's to stop you from enjoying it where ever, when ever? I do. Like whilst sketching or on bike rides (although sadly not in Japan, as it's illegal to listen to music whilst cycling), or while jogging.

I'm also a huge fan of Lennon & McCartney - The Beatles was and is the only boy band I've ever loved (whilst my peers were drooling over Take That or NKOTB), and yes, I'm sure people will listen to their creations from years on. Especially the ones made in the 70's - master pieces.

I appreciate a vast array of genres and creators, from classical music to jazz, from blues to hiphop, from tango to classic rock. I can perhaps thank my classical music training for being able to really appreciate music, but also for being quite strict and critical towards it. I don't think that resonating with a very wide audience or age group alone is actually necessarily a sign of 'good or timeless' music. Just check what majority of the folks are listening to these days - you can't really call that stuff quality. (Not really their fault though - more the fault of commercial radio stations and their playlists, and advertising deals). I just mainly hope that genuine music, made with passion and real talent survives. No matter the genre nor the creator, or the amount of awards or the placements on ranking lists.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Ramones

0 ( +2 / -2 )

You needn't worry about Dylan, his place in music history is secure. The public gets it, musicians get it.

I don’t and I acknowledge his contribution to his attention focusing on the blue collar working, but internationally, he’s not listened to and acoustically, he’s music is not memorable to the bigger world audience like the Beatles and the other groups I previously mentioned.

And yet, funnily enough, techno & trance classics done 30+ years ago still make the crowds go wild at any ug raves and clubs, and also at Berghain. Especially a lot of trance (and I'm not talking about the cheesy euro trance here) borrows from classical music as well. People also naturally respond to rhythm, what techno is all about.

Good point.

A huge influence on hip-hop, synth pop, electronica, house, techno, ambient, Depeche Mode, New Order, Bowie and, er, Coldplay.

Coldplay, I’m not so sure, but New Order, Depeche, Kraftwerk, Soft Cell were definitely pioneers in the early stages of what we now know is as Techno and rave which opened the door for people like Armin Van Buuren, Tiesto, Deadmou5 for that scene and genre, that music will be around for a very long time.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Probably dance music and "spiritual music" - popular songs from 100 years ago have all but disappeared while 1920s jazz and early blues music is still listened to, played and enjoyed all over the world. The waltz has a history of several hundred years and the polka swept Europe and North America nearly two hundred years ago; people are still dancing to their rhythms today. The modern equivalents are hip-hop and salsa I suppose.

I'd include modern electronic music under "spiritual music" - people like Brian Eno, William Basinski, Aphex Twin, Max Richter, Hiroshi Yoshimura and Harold Budd. So, music for the body and music for the heart and soul, same as it's always been.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

I don’t and I acknowledge his contribution to his attention focusing on the blue collar working, but internationally, he’s not listened to

He has toured the world. He sells records worldwide. He has received awards from many countries. His songs have been covered by an uncountable number of artists in different countries and in different languages. He was given a Nobel Prize. My Japanese coworker said his songs were in his school textbook.

Where do you get this stuff from

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Kid A on constant loop?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Which musicians? All of them. Not just the famous ones.

Fans are fans. There has been a subculture of preserving old music for as long as we have been able to document music.

I know exactly what music I like and hope endures. But each to their own, hopefully it all lasts.

100 years from now there will be some form of music sharing; trading tapes or telepathic playlists. Who knows?

But one thing is certain; there will still be music geeks.

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he’s music is not memorable to the bigger world audience like the Beatles and the other groups I previously mentioned.

I don't think fame is the factor you think it will be 100 years from now. Some relative unknowns may find widespread appreciation in the future, while some of the most popular acts will be entirely forgotten.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

In 100 years, people will be like, “humans actually made music 100 years ago? Not the Music Generator App? Sounds like a lot of work.”

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In 100 years, I’m guessing some form of brain-wave link AI will generate music on demand based on the user’s mood, complete with a recall function that can replay songs that the user wants to hear again.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

John Peel's favourite ever song, Teenage Kicks by Derry's own The Undertones.

Rick Astley's never gonna give you up, and James Blunt will stalk you too, because you're beautiful.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

John Peel's favourite ever song, Teenage Kicks by Derry's own The Undertones.

And there's part of the problem. You mentioned that song and I immediately wanted to hear it again. And so it's my current most favorite. Tomorrow it will be Jimi Hendrix's version of All Along The Watchtower, but then it will be back to various versions of The Weight and then the Holland-Dozier-Holland circuit. (But

So I wondered if there was a more objective approach to the question. Perhaps the songs that have been covered the most times by other artists. If that's an appropriate measure, then it seems mainly Beatles songs will be top favorites. (Based on data at the link below.)

https://stacker.com/stories/3975/most-covered-songs-all-time

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Aphex Twin

Good call.

Not so prolific, but I'd be very interested to hear a new album. See if he's still innovative.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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