The top of the damaged No. 3 reactor building at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant Photo: REUTERS/Aaron Sheldrick/File
national

TEPCO completes removal of spent fuel rods from Fukushima No. 3 reactor

29 Comments
By Aaron Sheldrick

The requested article has expired, and is no longer available. Any related articles, and user comments are shown below.

© Thomson Reuters 2021.

©2021 GPlusMedia Inc.

29 Comments
Login to comment

Lots of great technology will come from this great disaster that occurred. Humans are amazing in my opinion.

-14 ( +4 / -18 )

“Safer location”? The moon?

10 ( +13 / -3 )

Two rooftop fuel rod assembly pools out of four have now been cleared or rods. It took ten years, but it was worth it. Congratulations.

Two more fuel rod pools to go.

Finally, in about 10 years, (2030 onwards?) they will be able to start figuring out how to remove the melted corium down below reactors 1, 2 and 3.

14 ( +14 / -0 )

Nuclear power: So safe and cheap it’s not worth metering.

5 ( +11 / -6 )

Three overheated reactors melted down in the world's worst nuclear disaster

Yeah you can say this again! No need to compare with the other place.

But typical deflection!

1 ( +4 / -3 )

@bokuda,

I do a lot of cycling and a few months after the disaster when I was cycling in Saitama and Northern Tokyo and Chiba I got tons of nosebleeds.

It coincided with the farmers burning off the husks from the rice,or whatever the word is called.

I recalled that the wind was blowing towards Tokyo around the time of the meltdowns.

I kept my daughter from school and its dusty playground.

Hope you are well.

9 ( +10 / -1 )

It will provide TEPCO with important experience and data for the much tougher and time consuming task of extracting melted reactor cores and debris in the coming decades.

The most depressing part of this is realizing that its been 10 years already and they still haven't even started with the hard work.

10 ( +11 / -1 )

A remarkable achievement that began only last year. The spent fuel was removed using remote control equipment because of the high levels of radiation.

The spent fuel removal from reactors 1&2 will be much more difficult. The radiation levels inside the No2 reactor building are very high. It will take until about 2031 to complete.

Each stage is like a duct tape op with its own set of dangers.

The safer location mentioned in the post is just the common pool.

The removal of the melted fuel or corium is not currently possible because TEPCO does not know how it can be done. It won't be achieved for decades.

Chernobyl happened in 1986 and is still going on.

11 ( +11 / -0 )

@/goodlucktoyou

I think they need to send this spent fuel to Mars. Just dump all the trash on another plant..

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

SandyBeach

Lots of great technology will come from this great disaster that occurred. Humans are amazing in my opinion.

I hope so too. However, if by "green" you mean windmills and solar panels, I have to disagree. The only viable large-scale green technology on the horizon is nuclear, and there are amazing and safe new designs out there. The windmill&solarpanel craze only benefits China, which produces the toxic rare earths needed for that pipedream.

-12 ( +3 / -15 )

The removal of the spent fuel from the No3 reactor began in April 2019, a little less than two years.

Videos

https://www.tepco.co.jp/en/hd/decommission/visual/video/index-e.html?videoSort=sort-removal

2021.2.26 "The current situation at Fukushima Daiichi NPS" -From 3.11 toward the future- (ver. Feb. 2021)

https://www4.tepco.co.jp/en/news/library/archive-e.html?video_uuid=ntv9i42c&catid=69631

2 ( +2 / -0 )

PLEASE explain safe.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Lots of great technology will come from this great disaster that occurred. Humans are amazing in my opinion.

The only promising great energy technology for the future is Nuclear Fusion (hydrogen-based energy). Research is going on especially in Europe.

Unlike Nuclear fission (Fukushima, Chernobyl...), Nuclear fusion does not produce long-living radioactive wastes. Yes, it produces tritium, but within the plant in a closed circuit, (since tritium is necessary to sustain the process) and (even if emitted outside due to a disaster) has a short half-life.

The international ITER project, based in France, is encouraging. EU, the USA, and also Japan are joining the project.

https://www.iter.org/

Besides, many countries not only are joining the ITER project but are also focusing on additional national projects (such as Italy):

https://www.iter.org/of-interest/838

Japan is the worst country for building Nuclear Fission technology and reactors (such as Fukushima). Japan is a country cursed by nature (typhoons, strong earthquakes, tsunami). And, as Fukushima showed, the so-called “always clock working and efficient Japan” is affected by many human errors. It is not a mystery that the first reason for the nuclear disaster in Fukushima was related to TEPCO staff inefficiency and the nuclear-plant site project.

9 ( +10 / -1 )

At least they are achieving something, though the complete cleanup job will take decades if not a century, and the costs will continue to grow. Guess who will pay!

willib, I fear you are in error and have a dearth of knowledge in the subject, the only aspect you got partly right was the rare earths element. There are some good designs for intrinsically safer nuclear plants but as yet none are built so in the near to medium term all the green tech you so denigrate is both the only practical alternative to continuing to poison the planet and progressively cheaper.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Humans are amazing in my opinion.

I don't know. I used to think that (or was rather told that) when I was young.

But it's been proven now that the second most common element in the Universe after Hydrogen is not Helium, but human stupidity. If you don't believe me, go for a drive or just spend few minutes reading comments in a variety of topics.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

So thats the retired fuel rods kept on the side in the same building because no one came up with a permanent resting place so far.

The melted(?) operating material in the center is a different story altogether and will still have my grandchild pondering.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Humans are amazing?

Amazingly foolish yes.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

TEPCO estimates that 1.37 trillion yen ($12.6 billion) will be needed over 12 years to remove melted nuclear fuel from reactors at the crippled Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

People want to believe that it is possible to generate huge amounts of energy to power their digital lives without any negative consequences or economic externalities. Green energy is being sold that way and it is a massive lie. Solar power is particularly damaging considering the mining involved in obtaining the materials and the toxicity of the end of life panels. Green energy sources are not dependable based on weather conditions and the time of day. There is no free lunch - the bill always comes due sooner or later.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

There is no free lunch - the bill always comes due sooner or later.

The bill for this nuclear disaster will come both sooner and later. Current estimates are about ¥80 trillion and 50 plus years. That does not include the cost of storing highly radioactive waste for tens of thousands of years. Even with nuclear energy, there's no free lunch or dinner.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

It's a long way to go, but this is another small step toward clean-up of the Nuclear disaster.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Goodlucktoyou

“Safer location”?

From less safer location:

https://www.yomiuri.co.jp/science/20210228-OYT1T50108/

0 ( +0 / -0 )

"A total of 4,433 nuclear fuels still remain in the pools of Units 1, 2, 5, and 6 of the plant. In the future, the company plans to begin removing Unit 6 by the end of FISCAL 2022. In the first decommissioning schedule compiled by the government and TEPCO in December 2011, the plan was to remove all nuclear fuel from the pool of Units 1 to 4 within 10 years, but the process has been significantly delayed and the completion of the removal from all six reactors has been delayed to 31 years."

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Solar power is particularly damaging considering the mining involved in obtaining the materials and the toxicity of the end of life panels. Green energy sources are not dependable based on weather conditions and the time of day. There is no free lunch - the bill always comes due sooner or later.

Fukushima will end up costing a trillion dollars and take 30-40 years to clean up, as well as ruining the lives of thousands of people, the agriculture, the industry and the reputation of a large part of the country for generations.

But yeah, let's be scared of windmils. Those blades could take your eye out.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

englisc aspyrgend

willib, I fear you are in error and have a dearth of knowledge in the subject,

and what is your knowledge in the subject?

the only aspect you got partly right was the rare earths element.

...and that does not scare you? Have you seen any documentary about the nightmarish environmental disaster that rare earth mining in China represents? And the results of rare earth poisoning?

so in the near to medium term all the green tech you so denigrate is both the only practical alternative to continuing to poison the planet and progressively cheaper.

I do not see that either wildly fluctuating windmills or solar panels (which have a lifespan of about 30 years, after which they turn to toxic waste) are are viable alternative, and does "progressively cheaper" mean something other than "increasing subsidies"?

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

a testament to the ridiculous to the nth level of waste ever created on the planet and why nuclear should be abolished if not illegal for the waste that it produces.

Compared to a solar panel disaster would be a sunny day.

Tesla working with Hawaii and other locales to use batteries at night and solar during the day, weaning off diesel fuels. Already success in Australia stabalizing their grid and increasing capacity over time.

Japan has to start thinking positiviely about its future not weighed down by constant self-inflicted disaster

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Rare earth minerals are mined in other countries, like America. Their use is not restricted to solar panels. They are used in all electronic devices including mobile phones. As well as military jet engines, satellites and lasers. Used in rechargeable batteries for electric and hybrid cars, advanced ceramics, computers, DVD players, wind turbines, catalysts in cars and oil refineries, monitors, televisions, lighting, lasers, fiber optics, superconductors, and glass polishing.

At the end of life, solar panels like other electronics can be recycled.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

zichi

Their use is not restricted to solar panels.

Yes, but if you want to use them for energy production on a massive scale, like in solar panel power plants and supermagnets in windmills, you are talking about volumes that are in a totally different dimension than your smartphones.

At the end of life, solar panels like other electronics can be recycled.

Well, take a look at what that recycling looks like in the real world. And there are other towns like Agobloshie all over the 3rd world;

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mleQVO1Vd1I

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Green energy is being sold that way and it is a massive lie. Solar power is particularly damaging considering the mining involved.

How about wind energy / turbines? Are those bad for the environment as well?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites