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Police officer's loaded gun, handcuffs found in Osaka convenience store

26 Comments
By Casey Baseel, SoraNews24

At around 10 a.m. on Wednesday morning, a customer at a convenience store in Osaka’s Kita Ward found two startling things inside the shop’s toilet: a pair of handcuffs and a loaded gun.

The customer informed the manager, who in turn informed the police, who then were able to trace the handgun and restraints to none other than one of their own officers. Earlier that morning, a 30-something police sergeant who was assigned to a security detail in the area had also been at the convenience store in order to use the toilet.

The officer had removed his belt entirely and to hang it on the hook on the inside of the toilet door (more commonly used for hanging the occupant’s bag or coat), and attached to the belt were his holster, pistol and cuffs. Apparently, he forgot to strap his belt back when he left the toilet to go back to work.

In total, about 30 minutes passed between the officer leaving the items behind and them being recovered, and it’s a testament to how safe Japan is that not only did the people who found them promptly contact the proper authorities, the officer himself hadn’t even noticed he was missing his firearm or restraints until he was told, implying that he believes the likelihood of using them is low enough that he feels no need to regularly recheck that they’re still there. As for not noticing that he was missing his belt, the officer was using a squad car during his shift, and sitting down likely made him less likely to notice his pants were riding at a different height than usual.

There are no signs that the gun or handcuffs were used during the 30 minutes they were unattended, but it’s still a serious screw-up, prompting an Osaka Metropolitan Police spokesperson to say “We will strive to more properly control and secure police equipment, so that this does not happen again.” You’ll notice, though, that the statement doesn’t say “so that this does not happen a second time,” which might be because Wednesday’s incident is already the second time a police officer has left a gun in that same convenience store’s toilet, with the last occurrence happening three years ago.

So why does that particular toilet keep becoming an inadvertent weapons storage locker? It might have something to do with its location, which is close to Osaka’s U.S. consulate, and thus the increased security requirements for the neighborhood. More police officers in the area means more police officers stopping by to use the toilet than at other convenience stores, and so more chances that one of them might be forgetful. The heightened security may also mean more officers in cars than on foot, which, as discussed above, would make it harder to notice a missing belt.

Sources: NHK News Web, Nikkan Sports, Jiji, FNN

Read more stories from SoraNews24.

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-- Wakayama cop loses fully-loaded automatic handgun on the street while guarding PM

-- [Bullets on the bullet train as three men found carrying guns on Japan’s Shinkansen](Bullets on the bullet train as three men found carrying guns on Japan’s Shinkansen)

© SoraNews24

©2021 GPlusMedia Inc.

26 Comments
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Looks like someone is going to be taken off security detain and getting more time in the Koban! If he is lucky....

7 ( +8 / -1 )

how about installing toilets in the kobans so that the cops don't have to go somewhere else to use the toilet

14 ( +14 / -0 )

a pair of handcuffs and a loaded gun.

if there was a dame in there too you have a movie.

10 ( +11 / -1 )

@Aly Rustom

how about installing toilets in the kobans so that the cops don't have to go somewhere else to use the toilet

Asia does not have a history of fostering minds to be attuned to logic. "Two holes, one recycle bin" Land.

11 ( +12 / -1 )

A big poster campaign everywhere and a new cute mascot will do. ‘Don’t forget your loaded guns and handcuffs after flushing and leaving the toilet.’ In addition it would be very funny in quite safe Japan. lol

9 ( +10 / -1 )

 It might have something to do with its location, which is close to Osaka’s U.S. consulate, and thus the increased security requirements for the neighborhood. More police officers in the area means more police officers stopping by to use the toilet than at other convenience stores

Out of consideration to the owner of the said convenience store, as the evidence implies, the city of Osaka may at least compensate or reimburse the water/sewage bill.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

I remember a similar incident happening a few years back where an officer left his gear in a konbini toilet and a female police officer working in a different line of work misplacing her service firearm and handcuffs while on the said job. But hey, I'm surprised nobody had the interest in taking those.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

ToshihiroToday  03:49 pm JST

I remember a similar incident happening a few years back where an officer left his gear in a konbini toilet and a female police officer working in a different line of work misplacing her service firearm and handcuffs while on the said job. But hey, I'm surprised nobody had the interest in taking those.

I am amazed too that not even one chimpira (yakuza) went in that toilet. Geez..in Osaka!

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Ridiculous keystone cop scenario. Terminate his employment. How can you use a toilet and walk out and not feel that you are lighter. In the USA someone would have taken those items and sold them on the black market.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Again..how many times have we read the same story and how many management responses about " making sure it doesn't happen again " .

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Every time these stories come up, they offer comedic relief during a stressful time. It's just mind boggling.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

"how about installing toilets in the kobans so that the cops don't have to go somewhere else to use the toilet"

Does the west have kobans???? By the way, kobans have toliets.

Incidentally, the cop was not from a Koban, he was on patrol near the US consulate.

It might have something to do with its location, which is close to Osaka’s U.S. consulate, and thus the increased security requirements for the neighborhood. More police officers in the area means more police officers stopping by to use the toilet than at other convenience stores, and so more chances that one of them might be forgetful. The heightened security may also mean more officers in cars than on foot, 

1 ( +4 / -3 )

It might have something to do with its location, which is close to Osaka’s U.S. consulate, and thus the increased security requirements for the neighborhood. More police officers in the area means more police officers stopping by to use the toilet than at other convenience stores, and so more chances that one of them might be forgetful. The heightened security may also mean more officers in cars than on foot, 

There's a koban just down the road from there, actually. But maybe time was not on his side. When you gotta go, you gotta go.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Quite careless of the officer, lucky a Good Samaritan handed it in.

So what measures are they going to take, again, to ensure it doesn’t happen, again?

4 ( +4 / -0 )

He almost went off half-cocked.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Well, Hawkeye, it is Japan, not the USA. Black market? That's amusing. Terminate his employ, very American.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

The officer had removed his belt entirely and to hang it on the hook on the inside of the toilet door (more commonly used for hanging the occupant’s bag or coat), and attached to the belt were his holster, pistol and cuffs. Apparently, he forgot to strap his belt back when he left the toilet to go back to work.

Isn't "the hook" on the inside of the door.

In other words, right in front of them as they take a squat to do their business?

Which means, unless they are slipping under the door's small crack opening, they MUST see the gun/belt before they leave the stall/room, correct?

So either these fools are simply NOT paying attention to what's right in front of their eyes (most likely), they are morons (most definitely) or they want to give away free prizes to a lucky customer? (probably not)

Good to see our tax money being used on qualified people.

Real comforting.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

In total, about 30 minutes passed between the officer leaving the items behind and them being recovered, and it’s a testament to how safe Japan is

or how ignorant the officers are

> not only did the people who found them promptly contact the proper authorities,

"proper authorities?" Who? The cops, themselves? They're the ones messing up!

the officer himself hadn’t even noticed he was missing his firearm or restraints until he was told, implying that he believes the likelihood of using them is low enough that he feels no need to regularly recheck that they’re still there. 

Or, maybe he can't tell the difference between a belt with a loaded gun and a belt that's just made to hold up his pants?

> As for not noticing that he was missing his belt, the officer was using a squad car during his shift, and sitting down likely made him less likely to notice his pants were riding at a different height than usual.

Was probably too busy watching Terrace House on his phone. Gotta get his Seina fix.

> There are no signs that the gun or handcuffs were used during the 30 minutes they were unattended, but it’s still a serious screw-up, prompting an Osaka Metropolitan Police spokesperson to say “We will strive to more properly control and secure police equipment, so that this does not happen again.” 

I'm convinced. Good to know the ones that are incompetent will protect us from their own incompetency. It's good to feel safe!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

> "how about installing toilets in the kobans so that the cops don't have to go somewhere else to use the toilet"

Does the west have kobans????

Does the West have cops who forget their guns??!

By the way, kobans have toliets. 

So why was he using the convenient stores toilets?

Incidentally, the cop was not from a Koban, he was on patrol near the US consulate. 

So the cops that are patrolling the consulates forget their guns in the convenience store toilet????

It might have something to do with its location, which is close to Osaka’s U.S. consulate, and thus the increased security requirements for the neighborhood. More police officers in the area means more police officers stopping by to use the toilet than at other convenience stores, and so more chances that one of them might be forgetful. The heightened security may also mean more officers in cars than on foot

Whatever. There is no excuse for forgetting your gun in a convenience store toilet for god’s sake.Especially when you’re tasked with protecting Embassy’s for god sake Just more proof that you are incompetent

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Are Osaka cops the most useless on the planet?

1 ( +3 / -2 )

I dread to think if this had happened in any other country in the world

2 ( +2 / -0 )

What a peaceful country Japan is. The police officer was careless enough to leave their belongings such as guns. He might have to deal with personal information at his work. In that case, he is more likely to accidentally leak such data outside from police station. It might be a small slip-up, but also terrible slip-up. Therefore I want him to be more responsible as a police.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The officer was in toilet training, there is no need for cuffs and guns, when he was dropping bombs.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I hope the combini manager went ballistic at the dumb cop. I would.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

These mistakes by police are dealt with by demotions, if it was the first time he had a serious case needing internal discipline. If it was his second or later discipline case, then the seriousness of this offense will result in his termination.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I thought this story was a repeat of an earlier one I'd read a few months ago... but no, its the same old story, same thing keeps happening, and admittedly had I found such an item in a 7-11 toilet, I'd quietly go to the local Police box, and smugly hand it in... Police Officers are Human, after all, and we all make mistakes. But, what's different in Japan, is that people don't often see the opportunity to realize a serious crime - such as using that Officer's gun to blast away an annoying spouse, work-colleague, neighbour, etc.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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