Photo: Pakutaso
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Saitama officially forbids walking up and down escalators

89 Comments
By SoraNews24

Masahiro Kawase is a 48-year-old office worker who suffered a stroke six years ago and is paralyzed on his left side. However, in Saitama Prefecture custom dictates that everyone who rides an escalator stands on the left and walks – or in some cases runs – up the right side.

This makes what ought to be a normal commute for Kawase a harrowing experience. When boarding the escalator he must grab the right side handrail, steady himself, then slide over to the left. He also must do all this before others shove him and shout at him to get out of the way.

Now, however, Kawase and others like him may find some relief in Saitama’s new ordinance that was passed on March 26 to prohibit any movement while riding escalators. The ordinance, which will take effect next October, also requires places with escalators to put signage asking riders to refrain from walking or running on the machines.

▼ As seen in this news report, some make-shift signs have already gone up, but people are still running.

While consideration for people like Kawase is one of the motivating factors for this ordinance, Saitama is also hoping to help curb the roughly 775 escalator injuries that happen a year in Japan, a little over half of which are caused by not standing still and holding handrails.

NHK spoke with Edogawa University Professor Emeritus Masakazu Toki, who said that the custom began during the bubble era when work efficiency took precedence over consideration for weaker people. “Manners are usually created through people’s behavior and thinking,” said Professor Toki, “so it’s a little disappointing that this time they need to be stipulated in an ordinance. However, there have been calls for this for over 10 years and little has changed, so I appreciate that this was established. The ordinance respects autonomy rather than surveillance and penalties.”

As Prof. Toki said, like with other ordinances that made headlines in the past, there are no punishments for violating them. The goal instead is to put the matter at the forefront and hope people take the time to consider it and change their behavior accordingly. That might not sound so effective, but in some cases it has been enough to create significant change in the past.

Most comments about the news generally support not walking on escalators, but some people took issue with making a law out of it in this way.

“Next time I see someone blocking the escalator, I’ll know they’re from Saitama.”

“Great job Saitama! If you want to walk, use the stairs.”

“I don’t know. This problem won’t be solved until it’s nationwide.”

“I don’t really understand ordinances. What do they do?”

“I’m always worried when riding with my child that someone will rush by and knock them over. I hope this spreads.”

“I admit I run up sometimes, but I still think this is a good idea. If you can run, then you can use the stairs.”

“Just make all escalators wide enough for one person and watch the problem disappear.”

Changing all of the escalators in Japan is a solution, but probably more long-term than some people want to see. However, a similar effect might come about naturally anyway.

With Japan’s aging society where already one in four women is over 70, the balance of escalator climbers versus escalator riders will surely continue to shift. As Prof. Toki mentioned, the culture of escalator-climbing came about naturally at a time when the number of young business people rose sharply. Now, as we enter the age where the population is dominated by the elderly, what’s considered appropriate on escalators could also change naturally.

Sources: NHK, My Game News Flash

Read more stories from SoraNews24.

-- Tokyo taking a stand on walking up and down escalators

-- Japanese escalator cleaning crew discovers an absurd amount of change

-- This is what happens when a crowded escalator suddenly reverses【Video】

© SoraNews24

©2021 GPlusMedia Inc.

89 Comments
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Nanny state being normalized day by day.

12 ( +29 / -17 )

People need to be ordered not to run up or down escalators?

There are some really dumb people in this world.

4 ( +15 / -11 )

Ordinances to tell us how to use our bodies? Classy...

13 ( +21 / -8 )

It wouldn't affect me if such an ordinance is introduced to my neighborhoods. Especially walking alone I always take steps and staircases for quick exercises.

As Prof. Toki mentioned, the culture of escalator-climbing came about naturally at a time when the number of young business people rose sharply. Now, as we enter the age where the population is dominated by the elderly, what’s considered appropriate on escalators could also change naturally.

Here I see some paradox: aided mobility services make you faster aged. Aging starts with legs. In time of emergency, with all services shutdown you'd have to move yourself anyway. Use more steps for health and survival ... and of course you're free to run up & down even in Saitama :)

1 ( +3 / -2 )

I'm just curious as to how officials do intend to enforce this.

10 ( +12 / -2 )

Let's see how effectively this is going to be enforced and how effective is in preventing accidents, I would think the kind of people that rush on escalators to the point of having accidents are also the kind of people that would ignore this kind of rules.

14 ( +18 / -4 )

I'm just curious as to how officials do intend to enforce this.

Like they did on Roppongi Hills. Stand around with signs and megaphones urging people not to do it.

13 ( +15 / -2 )

Escalator police shaming you for walking up an escalator. I get it and don't get it at the same time

4 ( +6 / -2 )

I'm just curious as to how officials do intend to enforce this.

Like they did on Roppongi Hills. Stand around with signs and megaphones urging people not to do it.

Monitoring with CCTVs is enough.

Let's see how effectively this is going to be enforced and how effective is in preventing accidents, I would think the kind of people that rush on escalators to the point of having accidents are also the kind of people that would ignore this kind of rules.

Though the ordinance carries no specific penalty, the running guy could be charged and liable should any accident and damage occur as a result of the breach. Without extenuation. That's how it's expected to work, deter problems.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

Fighto!Today  07:01 am JST

People need to be ordered not to run up or down escalators?

There are some really dumb people in this world.

YOU said it.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Well, speed up the escalators, then! Japanese escalators move at the glacial speed of a lame sloth, unlike those in London or Singapore.

13 ( +16 / -3 )

What a stupid rule which will be ignored by me and most others if I'm unfortunate enough to have to visit Tokyo's poor northern suburb.

2 ( +8 / -6 )

Rule is stupid.

Oh, and the reason people rush on scalators is because of stress of modern life, which kills far more people than scalators themselves -specially in Japan-. Sure Saitama officials will never have a moment to consider this, it's too much complex for their level of capability.

5 ( +10 / -5 )

TOKYO

Masahiro Kawase is a 48-year-old office worker who suffered a stroke six years ago and is paralyzed on his left side. 

im more concerned about this in the article not sure how it’s related but having a stroke 6 year ago mean he was 42 at the time and too young this alerting to the fact it’s related to Japanese work hours working to death called “kaoroshi”

4 ( +10 / -6 )

People need to be ordered not to run up or down escalators?

There are some really dumb people in this world.

You are right. Why do people need to be told to not run up or down escalators? Surely they would not run, or even walk, out of common everyday politeness. But sadly, people are rude and their behavour endangers others that are weaker than themselves, and thus the need for more laws like this.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

If only the same logic was applied to public mask-wearing.

-1 ( +6 / -7 )

People need to be ordered not to run up or down escalators?

There are some really dumb people in this world.

No, there are some really dumb people in Japan.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

im more concerned about this in the article not sure how it’s related but having a stroke 6 year ago mean he was 42 at the time and too young this alerting to the fact it’s related to Japanese work hours working to death called “kaoroshi”

This assumes too much, there are many reasons that increases the chances of strokes in young people, besity, diabetes, high blood pressure, etc. Over 10% of strokes happen to people under 45.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

It will not work

3 ( +4 / -1 )

The new rule is not going to work. Most train stations have elevators for people with disabilities and mothers pushing baby carriages. Mr Kawase might consider using one in his daily commute.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Maybe everyone should just STAY HOME. the world is to dangerous!!!!

8 ( +10 / -2 )

Stupid ordinance.

What counts is the differential speed between persons in stairs, whether mechanical (escalators) or hard stairs.

Are they going to limit speed for people going up or down the hard stairs ?

It's all a matter of dangerous behavior or not, and an old person will also be knocked down the same on the ground outside stairs.

Making all people going to the pace of the slowest is not respectful to young people.

What I dislike in Japan is moving at snail pace in public stranded place to be 30% (my estimate) slower than anywhere else in the world !

It is not about safety, it is just one has to undergo the aging society, making young people the wrong minority while it should given priority.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

OxycodinToday  08:22 am JST

TOKYO

Masahiro Kawase is a 48-year-old office worker who suffered a stroke six years ago and is paralyzed on his left side. 

im more concerned about this in the article not sure how it’s related but having a stroke 6 year ago mean he was 42 at the time and too young this alerting to the fact it’s related to Japanese work hours working to death called “kaoroshi”

Not sure what you mean by "how it's related" but it's related to the article because the guy needs to use his right arm to hold the handrail because of his stroke. As to having a stroke at 42 because of overwork; that's an assumption way too far.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

The ordinance, which will take effect next October, also requires places with escalators to put signage asking riders to refrain from walking or running on the machines.

No punishment and no enforcement. A dog with no bite, like most ordnances. Tonight, I'll go and stand by a no smoking sign and see how many smokers are standing doing their thing as usual.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

The escalators should be empty during the pandemic!

5 ( +5 / -0 )

So, now we just stay in the middle?

2 ( +3 / -1 )

“Next time I see someone blocking the escalator, I’ll know they’re from Saitama.”

Expect oyaji vigilantism.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

Why are they able to do this but mask wearing cannot be mandated

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Cue outrage from the usual suspects.

Just please be careful and respectful to those of us who aren't in a hurry like the speed freaks.

0 ( +6 / -6 )

Just please be careful and respectful to those of us who aren't in a hurry like the speed freaks.

Huh? As sometime pointed out above, why is passing somebody on an escalator different from passing somebody on non-moving stairs, or even on sidewalks?

6 ( +10 / -4 )

Remember stairs? Stairs were great.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Another ignorant measure in the name of 'safety' by the LDP pandering for elderly votes (similar to prohibiting bicycles from sidewalks). The news clip was a absolute joke.

Of course it wont be enforceable but we will all gradually see more & more old people, moms/kids standing in the walking lane to block those of us who can walk. Officials in stores and stations wont have to enforce it.

Its just another reason to avoid shopping malls, busy stations, crowds, unless absolutely necessary. Even more reason to shop on Amazon!

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

So they had to come up with one guy paralyzed on the right side of his body guy to justify stopping millions from walking up an escalator.

Nah. Not buying it.

4 ( +9 / -5 )

Jusf gof off the train and walked up the "slow" escalator as normal. Wondered why people were all politely lined up on the left side.

No wonder got a lot more stares than normal. Guess I will will join the herd, if I remember!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

There is an Ordinance . . . but no mention of how this will be policied or any penalties if people do not obey.

Worthless.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

i enjoy using the stairs anyway, especially if its cold outside, it helps keep me warm and the best part is that there are less people using them.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

> There is an Ordinance . . . but no mention of how this will be policied or any penalties if people do not obey.

Worthless.

Eventually you will have more & more people blocking the walking lane. It will be 'self enforced' and just imagine how many arguments & possible fights that will be caused.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Nagoya has had this rule for several years, escalators at stations are full of signs telling everyone to not walk on them. Everyone still obeys the custom: stand on the left, walk on the right. I don’t think it has made a noticeable impact on behavior.

But it does make bureaucrats look like they are doing their main job (putting signs with rules on them everywhere) so by that measure it has been a resounding success, as I am sure it will be in Saitama too.

13 ( +13 / -0 )

Well, speed up the escalators, then! Japanese escalators move at the glacial speed of a lame sloth, unlike those in London or Singapore.

Who cares about those transport hell holes?

Japanese escalators move at precisely the right speed. We're not all spright young things, ya know?

-8 ( +4 / -12 )

Japanese escalators move at precisely the right speed. We're not all spright young things, ya know?

Toasted, misunderstood? Faster or slower has nothing do with being sprightly or not. Unless you talking about the moment when you hop on/off? And "precisely the right speed" means what? They're snail pace here man, and that's why people walk them.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

So, what are they going to do if I choose to walk up the escalator anyway? NOTHING.

And I'm sorry, but I WILL continue to walk and/or run up the escalator if a train is coming and the lazy people are blocking the stairs because they all want to ride the escalator (otherwise I always use the stairs). Mr. Kawase, the man who had the stroke and needs to grab the right-side railing and stand on the right, is maybe one out of one thousand people who do so -- the rest of the people who generally block the 'passing' lane do so because of large shopping bags or wanting to stand beside and gabber with their fellow obachan. If there is a man like Mr. Kawase, or a parent with small children standing beside them, I believe THEN people will stop walking/running.

Or how about this -- you make the trains wait until all people have come up the escalator, with cameras to show whether people are making the ascent/descent? No? Why not? Might screw up the schedule? I can tell you they will take their sweet time replacing the escalators with single lane ones -- cause that costs money.

"“I admit I run up sometimes, but I still think this is a good idea. If you can run, then you can use the stairs.”

So... hang on... it's okay to run up and down the STAIRS?

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

Toasted HereticToday  10:50 am JST

Well, speed up the escalators, then! Japanese escalators move at the glacial speed of a lame sloth, unlike those in London or Singapore.

Who cares about those transport hell holes?

Amen to that.There's nothing like being manhandled onto a packed train during rush-hour in London or the likes...

Oh, wait a minute. That's not de rigueur in most overseas 'Hell holes'. I wonder why not?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Oh the irony!

So now they want to stop people from walking up escalators slowing everyone else down because they claim to worry about the elderly.

Then they provide vouchers across Japan to help the elderly buy power assisted bicycles that help them go far to fast in relation to their reflexes and they run into people can't stop a stop signs or red lights or brake quick enough in the event of an emergency.

Just this week I watched 2 elderly ladies on power assisted bicycles going far to fast for their age and abilities run into cars on our small road as the came around the corner.

Any fully abeled body person had plenty of time to stop, swerve, turn, to avoid hitting the very slow moving car (the car's actually stopped) but, no these old ladies panic look as they tried, just ran right into the car(s). Had they been on regular bicycles they would have been going far slower and been able to stop or avoid the accident.

One thing contradicting the other.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Japanese escalators move at precisely the right speed. We're not all spright young things, ya know?

Yeah just the right slow speed for the old ladies getting off to stop the instant the get off not moving out of the way of those coming up behind them.

Saitama say half the accidents are from people walking on escalators I am going to guess the other half are from old ladies blocking people trying to get off.

I have never once in 30 years in Japan seen an accident due to someone walking on escalators but I have seen plenty caused by old ladies stopping and blocking others behind them from safely getting off causing people to fall run into to other often the old ladies getting pushed to the ground as the rest pile into one and other.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Another complete waste of time. How are get they going to be able to enforce this?

0 ( +3 / -3 )

This very serious and extremely dangerous activity should be met with ¥50000 fines, the same as riding bicycles on the pavement.

-8 ( +2 / -10 )

What about walking backwards?

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Pretty sure people like this guy, who are physically disabled, shouldn’t be using an escalator in the first place. Good luck enforcing it!

2 ( +5 / -3 )

Another Onion tagline. This shows real dedication to identifying and undertaking the least important tasks imaginable in the face of all the other challenges the place faces.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

When escalators were first introduced no one walked up or down, over time as people got used to them they started moving on them, just like the moving walkways at airports. It's a sign of the times

2 ( +3 / -1 )

They're snail pace here man, and that's why people walk them.

Just enjoy the ride, for goodness sake. No wonder people give themselves heart attacks and stress. Rushing here, there and everywhere.

And please don't call me "man", thanks.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Another complete waste of time. How are get they going to be able to enforce this?

They could, I guess, employ people with time on their hands. You could always volunteer, mate, seeing how only yesterday you said you'd never come back to this site again...

How'd that work out?

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Just enjoy the ride, for goodness sake. No wonder people give themselves heart attacks and stress. Rushing here, there and everywhere.

Note that Japan has the lowest heart disease of all developed countries, heart attacks are actually quite rare, that is probably due to the fact Japanese walk everywhere as opposed to use elevators, escalators, cars for any distance past their driveway like in North America.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Note that Japan has the lowest heart disease of all developed countries, heart attacks are actually quite rare, that is probably due to the fact Japanese walk everywhere as opposed to use elevators, escalators, cars for any distance past their driveway like in North America.

Indeed. Probably busy capitalists doing all the running.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I think 'urging' people not to walk or run up and down would be more successful.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I see Japanese running all the time-maybe they should just get up 5 minutes earlier?

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

So what? Saitama wants to arrest people for the crime of WALKING? Insane nanny state.

How about all the cellphone zombies that walking while reading or texting? That is something to be truly concerned about. However there too I do not see how to criminalize it.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

I see Japanese running all the time-maybe they should just get up 5 minutes earlier?

That only works for people riding a single train, someone with 2-3 transfers would lose time on each, so they would need to wake up 20-30 minutes earlier, and it is not too hard to think people that would lose much more.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Whatever, Ima keep on living life, not changing a thing.

Its horrible to bump into disabled or small children. I think that I would a young child on an escalator anyways.

If Im busy Im gunna walk and not bump anyone. Or run up the stairs

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Why doesn't Mr Kawase just walk onto the left hand side in the first place...

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

What they need is someone that is standing at the top of the escalator to move the old people out of the way when they get to the top. So often they stand there and fiddle around looking for tickets, candy, flip phones and other things in plastic wrinkly clickity plastic bags.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

I do feel for the one guy they found to “prove” their story.

but Is Mr. Kawase on every escalator in Saitama-ken every single day all day long? I would think people would be able to avoid him for the 1-2 mins per day before 9 and after 6 that he might be on an escalator during his standard commute.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

This country has the slowest escalators I've seen anywhere in the world. Need to double the speed and maybe fewer people will feel the need to walk. In Hong Kong you don't see people walking up and down them, but they are significantly faster than here.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Kyakusenbi

What they need is someone that is standing at the top of the escalator to move the old people out of the way when they get to the top. So often they stand there and fiddle around looking for tickets, candy, flip phones and other things in plastic wrinkly clickity plastic bags.

Agree. That is truly dangerous.... much more so than walking on the escalator.

And the people who do that are typically those who stand on the think, aka the good guys...

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Speed up the escalators, its really slow compared to other countries like Hongkong is fast.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Absolutely idiotic..a typical Japanese technique of wasting time on something petty and insignificant..

I hate standing on an escalator...I like to walk..it an idiot is blocking the way I forcefully encourage them to walk or get out of the way....

1 ( +2 / -1 )

How about using the lift for Mr Kawase ?

Problem is that there is not enough amenities for the disabled .

4 ( +4 / -0 )

There are 2 types of people in this world;

Those absolutely afraid of freedom and individuality, and those that see this infantile rule for what it is.

Don't be the former.

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

Those making a fuss about this local ordinance, probably wish to smoke anywhere, throw garbage anywhere, drink anywhere, drive either right or left whichever you like. JUST USE STAIRS or leave Saitama。

1 ( +5 / -4 )

Those making a fuss about this local ordinance, probably wish to smoke anywhere, throw garbage anywhere, drink anywhere, drive either right or left whichever you like. JUST USE STAIRS or leave Saitama。

"Think of the children!!"

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

So what? Saitama wants to arrest people for the crime of WALKING? Insane nanny state.

Nobody said anything about arrests. Calm down.

There are 2 types of people in this world;

Those absolutely afraid of freedom and individuality, and those that see this infantile rule for what it is. 

Don't be the former.

I think there are more than 2 types of people in the world. Which category does Mr Kawase fit into? If you haven’t read the article yet his name is at the start of the first sentence, right at the top.

Also calm down.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

I think there are more than 2 types of people in the world. Which category does Mr Kawase fit into? If you haven’t read the article yet his name is at the start of the first sentence, right at the top.

Had to wait a long time in line at the combini yesterday. It was a real pain in the butt.

I think we should make a new law that limits the number of people inside a combini to 10 so that I don't get annoyed like that again.

I think 120 million Japanese should have to endure a silly, time-wasting new rule because I felt annoyed.

Didn't really think this through, did you?

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

Had to wait a long time in line at the combini yesterday. It was a real pain in the butt. 

I think we should make a new law that limits the number of people inside a combini to 10 so that I don't get annoyed like that again. 

I think 120 million Japanese should have to endure a silly, time-wasting new rule because I felt annoyed. 

Didn't really think this through, did you?

I think a lot.

I think you get annoyed too easily.

I also think your combini idea is really dumb.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

I’m also confused by your analogy. Freedom loving people don’t mind waiting in the combini or they get annoyed by it?

2 ( +3 / -1 )

The easiest and cheapest solution: it looks like they are taking some action, and mostly it saves their butt when they get sued. "Well, it was prohibited!"

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Bah bah...or is it meh meh?

How about people that can't use stairs or escalators use the elevators? Let people who have places to be get there as quickly or slowly as they want/need. Obviously, if you knock someone down then you are rude. But if you safely walk or even run up there stairs, who cares?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

No cost alternative for some area, they can set 2 UP and 2 DOWN escalators BUT with different positions(Left and Right) of "walking or running" people. This can fix this issue in places having double rides.

Or

Use turn:

Usually in Japan its a habit to leave 1 stair between us, so, with this combined with new idea all can be fixed with no cost for all places, without change or add anything else:

If a person can't stand on other people’s side, all has to do is at least, to LEAVE a STAIR in between as usual (avoiding side-by-side cases) so others will turn around to continue without waiting or being blocked behind.

Let take e.g of a place when the LEFT is used for 'walking/running" people:

_ :free space

1: person

∆: Forward move

/: Right move

\: Left move

NG scenario:

_.1 (used stair)

. (free stair)

_.1

.

_.1

.

1 (x) (theLeft blocked the way)

1 (this is person is blocked)

OKFixed scenario:

_.1 (used stair)

. (free stair)

_.1

.

_.1

.

_. 1

. (o) (solved)

_

. (o) ( as usual, 1 stair in between)

∆.1

1 (this person will use free right side and continue ...)

Move looks:

OKFixed scenario:

_.1

.

_.1

.

_.1

.

∆. 1

_.\

/._

∆.1

1 (This running/Walkin person)

I think with this approach there is, almost, no cost. It just based on change of the use-concept.

NoCost

This is my own short analysis view's solution. If can't work i believe can be improved to solve the mentioned issues, in this article.

Onegaishimas...

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

I walk up stairs and escalators, but many places have no stairs.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Just make more single file escalators single hand rail and narrow spacing between them, also make some faster than others.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

1 word.... WALL-E

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Take one or a few instances of a problem and devise a solution that everyone must follow- this is a good example of the tendency for government to impose controls on the behavior of individuals for no good reason. In East Asia this is natural as people are conditioned to look to authority to tell them how to behave. This mindset has spread to the West as well.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

Take one or a few instances of a problem and devise a solution that everyone must follow- this is a good example of the tendency for government to impose controls on the behavior of individuals for no good reason. In East Asia this is natural as people are conditioned to look to authority to tell them how to behave. This mindset has spread to the West as well.

A few instances of a virus side effect are enough to throw people into a tizzy.

The ‘it rarely happens’ excuse seems to swing whichever way the wind blows.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The whole point of escalators is to get up the stairs faster. People who stand on escalators are lazy... unless you’re a child, elderly, or disabled.

I can’t see this being enforced, just like riding a bike on the left, or stopping a car at a red light aren’t enforced.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

I usually follow local custom to appease native sentiment. Generally in Japan, people seem to stand to one side of the escalator and walk carefully up or down on the other. Everyone seems to know which side is which - nobody walks up the standing side, and nobody stands on the walking side. I once read that people stand on different sides in different Japanese cities. Not sure if that is true, but it wouldn't surprise me.

So this does present an ethical dilemma for 'legal aliens' such as myself. If I'm funnelled into the 'walking side' of an escalator by the crowd, what do I do? Annoy dozens of locals by obeying the rules and suddenly standing still? That's thirty people with another reason to hate gaijins. Or do I break the rules and carry on walking like all the local rebels, fearing uniformed officers awaiting me on the platform?

The only person I've ever seen fall in Japan at a station, was a lady walking down a flight of steps who missed her footing (at Ikebukuro). Everyone around her went to her assistance. She was shocked but OK, despite it being quite a fall.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Are the police going to arrest someone who moves on the escalator?

Sheesh.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I am curious as to what the penalty could possibly be for not following this pointless waste of public money ordinance. Because a penalty for bullying and telling a person to kill themselves on-line was just 9.000 yen so in this case 1 yen?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The last time I saw a Ministry of Walks was in a Monty Python skit. Now, Saitama has one.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I am curious as to what the penalty could possibly be for not following this pointless waste of public money ordinance. Because a penalty for bullying and telling a person to kill themselves on-line was just 9.000 yen so in this case 1 yen?

How exactly would public money be wasted by this ordinance?

Are the police going to arrest someone who moves on the escalator?

Of course not. But this gives every/good reason for ordinary people to take actions to stop them just like when you can't help complaining to those smoking anywhere they want.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

So much for promoting a Healthier lifestyle...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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