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The release of one million tons of contaminated water into the marine environment imposes considerable risks to the full enjoyment of human rights of concerned populations in and beyond the borders of Japan,

8 Comments

Marcos Orellana, Michael Fakhri and David Boyd, three independent U.N. human rights experts, expressing regret over Japan's recent decision to release treated radioactive water accumulated at the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, saying it could impact millions of people across the Pacific region.

© Kyodo

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Well, there goes that coveted seat at the UN Security Council that Japan's been jockeying for since the early 70's.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Gee that was a smoothie sentence...

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How is contaminating the planet a humans rights issue?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

UN Human Rights Council and so called experts are even more contaminated.

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Dehydrate as much of the water as possible, take contaminated residue, place in a container, send into outer space via rocket launch, . . . to outside Earth's planetary system . . . .

an object acted upon by a force will continue in motion until acted upon by another force.

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I'm an active seagoer, and frankly, it doesn't bother me. There are far worse considerations regarding sea pollution than mildly radioactive waste.

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Dehydrate as much of the water as possible, take contaminated residue, place in a container, send into outer space via rocket launch, . . . to outside Earth's planetary system . . . .

Jt, I checked that out. Apparently, the radioisotopes would also evaporate into the atmosphere to eventually rain down on earth. I'd rather have it diluted into the sea.

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A little surprised @Laguna 3:34pm after you seemed to understand and thanks @James 9:15am Apr 18 for his ‘useful information’. (We were left ‘swayed to the opposition’ by his explanations):

“Tritium (3 H) is a radioactive isotope of hydrogen; it gives off radiation in the form of a beta particle. Tritium will bind anywhere hydrogen does, including in water, and in plant, animal and human tissue. It cannot be removed from the environment once it is released.

“As an isotope of hydrogen (the cell’s most ubiquitous element), tritium can be incorporated into essentially all portions of the living machinery; and it is not innocuous -- deaths have occurred in industry from occupational overexposure There is no evidence of a threshold for damage from 3 H exposure; even the smallest amount of tritium can have negative health impacts. (5 (+6/-1) “ -

Agree on your 2nd post @3:36pm. @Jtnose’s 1:45pm suggestions of launching “contaminated residue” into space by rocket with the chance of failure or reentry is a ‘scary idea’. Too much ‘junk’ out there already.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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